Q&As Roundups

Community Roundup: What Does It Mean To Be Vulnerable?

Allowing yourself permission to be vulnerable is important when facing chronic illness or disability. Here's some advice on how to do so.

Learning to be vulnerable is an important part of being human. It’s what you have to do to fall in love, to have a child, to grieve, and to accept yourself… especially in the face of chronic illness or disability.

That’s why, this week, we asked our community: what does it mean to be “vulnerable?” From learning to ask for help, to resisting the urge to feign stoicism, here’s some of the best insights on the true definition of vulnerability that we heard from our community.

Also, a reminder: for next week’s roundup, we’re asking our community about the fictional character from fiction (TV, film, literature, video games, or other) that has inspired them most in the face of disability or illness. So follow Folks on Twitter and tell us what you think!

Creative Commons image by Sandor Weisz

Roundups

Community Roundup: New Accomplishments, Post-Diagnosis

Getting married. Writing a book. Visiting Norway. These are just some of the things our readers have done after being diagnosed.

When you’re first diagnosed with a health condition, it can sometimes feel like the end of things. But even in the face of challenges, the nature of being human is to continue, and to persevere.

That’s why, for this week’s Community Round-Up, we asked Folks‘s Twitter followers: What’s something you never thought you could accommplish when you were diagnosied, that you now do?

The answers we received ran the gamut, from people telling us about how diagnosis spurred them to get married, travel new places, and finally sit down and write that book they were thinking about. But other responses we got were deeply honest and human, explaining that, for them, diagnosis didn’t have many bright sides, and we thought it was important to include those too.

For next week’s roundup, we’re asking our followers“Some people identify as disabled. Others don’t. How do you identify and why?” We’d love to hear your thoughts, so follow Folks on Twitter (@folksstories) and let us know! We’ll post our best answers next week.

Creative Commons photo by Kristoffer Trolle. Additional reporting by Josh Andrew.

Roundups Uncategorized

Community Roundup: What’s Your Favorite Thing About The Disability Community?

There’s this concept of ‘chosen family’ that refers to people you surround yourself with who support you. It’s a big concept in the LGBTQ community, where many people feel isolated from their biological families, but chosen family is equally important to the disabled and chronic illness communities for the same reason. This week, we asked […]

There’s this concept of ‘chosen family’ that refers to people you surround yourself with who support you. It’s a big concept in the LGBTQ community, where many people feel isolated from their biological families, but chosen family is equally important to the disabled and chronic illness communities for the same reason.

This week, we asked members of Folks’ Twitter community what their favorite thing about the chronic illness and disability community was. What many of the answers we received touched on was this concept of ‘chosen family’ and how much online communities can help support someone who is dealing with a life-changing illness or condition.

Also, this week we’re asking our followers: “What’s something you never thought you could accomplish when you were diagnosed, but which you successfully do now?” We’d love to hear your thoughts, so follow Folks on Twitter (@folksstories) and let us know! We’ll post our best answers next week.

Additional reporting by Josh Andrew.

Creative Commons photo by Lindsey Turner.

Q&As Roundups

Community Roundup: What’s The Best Advice You’ve Ever Received About Being Chronically Ill?

Tell your story. Advocate for yourself as a patient. Replace your old dreams or new ones. Here's some great advice on being disabled or chronically ill from our Twitter community.

Life is full of unwanted advice, from odious mansplainers to outmoded counsel from gently clueless elders. Unfortunately, when you’re chronically ill or disabled, this dial can often feel turned up to 11, as friends and acquaintances bombard you with advice that–while well-meaning–can often feel fairly clueless.

But that’s not always the case. Sometimes, someone actually gives really great advice, and it makes a profound impact on our lives. So for this week’s Community Round-Up, Folks‘s Twitter followers what piece of advice they had received on being disabled or chronically ill that was actually transformative to the way they handled their condition? What follows is some of our community’s best advice.

Also, this week we’re asking our followers: “What’s the most insightful question you’ve been asked about your disability or chronic illness?” We’d love to hear your thoughts, so follow Folks on Twitter (@folksstories) and let us know! We’ll post our best answers next week.

Additional Reporting by Josh Andrew.

Roundups The Good Fight

Community Roundup: How To Be A Good Ally To The Chronically Ill

From baking a sick friend a casserole to protesting with them on the front lines of the disabled rights movement, here are some of the best ways to be an ally to the chronically ill.

In today’s social and political environment, much is said about the importance of allyship to disenfranchised groups fighting the good fight, such as the #MeToo campaign against sexual harassment, #BlackLivesMatter, LGTBTQ activist orgs, and more.

The chronically ill and disabled need good allies just as much, and sometimes more, than those groups. But what does being a good ally to those dealing with health issues actually mean, and how does one go about becoming one?

So through our Twitter account, we asked our community: what does it mean to be an ally to someone with chronic illness or disability? We learned a lot from the answers we got back. Here’s some of the best:

What do you think? What’s the best way to be an ally to someone with chronic illness or disabilities? Follow us on Twitter @folkstories and let us know!

Q&As Roundups

Community Roundup: Imagining A World Where Disability Is Normal

From workplaces offering 'good health' days instead of sick days, to universal, affordable health care, a world in which it is 'normal' to be disabled or chronically ill doesn't sound dystopian at all. In fact, it sounds like heaven.

What does it mean to be normal? There’s lots of ways to answer that question, but if we’re being honest, most people would probably not consider chronic illness and disability as part of the recipe. But that’s wrong. In our lifetimes, every person will get sick, manage a health condition, or become disabled, so it’s *just* as normal–if not more so–to be dealing with these issues as it is to be walking around in so-called “good health,” with no health conditions whatsoever.

That got us thinking. If the average person’s definition of normal is so far off-base, what would the world look like if people with disablities got to define the idea of a ‘normal’ life?

So through our Twitter account, we asked our community, and the answers we got back were amazing. Here’s some of the best we received:

What do you think? What would the world look like if people with chronic illness or disabilities got to define the definition of ‘normal’? Follow us on Twitter @folkstories and let us know!