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Advice

Ask Ada: How Can I Help My Husband With Erectile Dysfunction?

This week, Ada helps a couple address a sensitive marital issue with patience and understanding. Plus: are peanut allergies really worth taking seriously? (Yes.)

Welcome to Ask Ada, Folks’ bi-weekly advice column for people impacted by health issues or disability. Want Ada to help you with a problem? Email Ada at askada@pillpack.com or tag @folksstories on Twitter with the #askada hashtag.

How Can I Help My Husband With Erectile Dysfunction?

Dear Ada,

My husband and I are having problems with intimacy. He used to be the person to initiate sex, but now I find that I’m the one encouraging it–and he rarely wants to participate. When we do have sex, he seems to have trouble getting or keeping an erection. At first I started to worry that he just wasn’t interested in me anymore, but lately I’ve noticed that whenever this happens, he seems more and more frustrated. Now I’m wondering if this could actually be a medical issue, like erectile dysfunction. I want him to talk to his doctor about it, but I can tell he’s embarrassed to even talk about it with me. I’m not sure how to give him the confidence and support he needs to set up an appointment. What should I do?

Sincerely, Ellen R.

Hi Ellen,

While it’s understandable to worry that you may be the cause of his condition, know that you aren’t to blame. There’s more to arousal than simple attraction — hormones, emotions, blood vessels, and the brain all play a factor. When something is off with one or more of those areas, the potential for erectile dysfunction is high.

It’s also something that’s extremely common. Various research studies report about 50% of men over the age of 40 have some issues with erectile dysfunctions. Though as prevalent as it may be, it frequently goes untreated, as some individuals feel uncomfortable discussing sexual health issues with their doctors–just like you’re concerned about.

Because you’re still interested in being intimate, it’s important for you to broach the conversation with him when he’s available to talk and not likely to be distracted. Before doing so, do some research into the condition that you can share with him. Let him know that you’d love to nurture the sexual part of your relationship, and you hope he’ll talk with his physician. Then, let him sit with the information, and make the decision on his own, making sure he knows you’ll be there with him every step of the way.

It’s like anything else about being in a partnership: sometimes it’s easy, and sometimes you have to work on it.

If the anxiety is holding him back, know that there are lifestyle changes that may help. Exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, and quitting smoking have shown to greatly improve ED problems. In addition, dealing with any psychological issues, like stress, anxiety, or depression may help with both interest in sex and the ability to perform.

There’s another factor here to consider too. Performance anxiety can be self-perpetuating. Every man will fail to achieve an erection when he wants to once in his life, but depending on how much it bothers him, it might kick off a cycle of erectile dysfunction, even when there’s nothing otherwise wrong.

All of which is to say that what your husband needs is your love, compassion, good humor, and support, and encourage him to see a doctor if the problem persists. Learning to deal with sexual dysfunction as a couple is, to a greater or lesser extent, part of every successful relationship. It’s like anything else about being in a partnership: sometimes it’s easy, and sometimes you have to work on it.

Photo by Sarah Pflug from Burst

My Kid’s Classmates Are Driving Me Nuts

Dear Ada,

My son is in kindergarten. At the beginning of the year, he got sent home with a letter letting us know the class was a peanut-free zone, so I made sure not to make any PB&Js and check labels. However, after a couple months, my son told me that some of the other students were bringing in peanut butter crackers and other snacks that I probably wouldn’t have sent him with. What gives? I’ll admit to not knowing much about allergies. Is it okay to send my son to school with nut snacks so long as he doesn’t sit near the allergic child?

– Worried Mom in MA

Hi Worried Mom,

Trust your gut. Don’t send your kid to school with food that contains peanuts.

Please trust your gut, and don’t send any food to school that contains peanuts.

If your son’s school deemed his class a peanut-free zone, then there is a child with access to that classroom who is allergic to peanuts, and exposure to it could cause a severe—potentially fatal—reaction.

Let’s put it this way. If a kid in that class goes into anaphylactic shock, and you’ve been sending your kids in with peanuts, is the fact that everyone was ignoring that child’s needs really going to soothe your conscience?

While it’s difficult to estimate how many children suffer with food allergies, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that four to six percent of U.S. children are affected, and that number is growing.

Unless you have a child with a food allergy, it’s difficult to understand the severity of a reaction.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases reports that “allergic reactions to foods can range from mild gastrointestinal symptoms or skin rashes to severe reactions that can be fatal.” In fact, according to the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, “Allergy to peanuts and tree nuts is the leading cause of fatal allergic reactions in the United States.”

There’s no snack special enough to risk making another child suffer with painful rashes, anaphylaxis, or any other reaction.

There’s no snack special enough to risk making another child suffer with painful rashes, anaphylaxis, or any other reaction.

If students are bringing peanut butter snacks to school, my best guess is the teacher isn’t aware that it’s happening. Take a moment today and send her an email or call her at school to let her know what your son told you.

This is also an excellent opportunity to teach your child to be an advocate for others. Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) reports that “about one-third of kids with food allergies report that they have been bullied because of their allergies.” Encourage him to support his classmate, and speak up if he notices anyone not taking the allergy seriously.

School should be a safe environment for children to learn and grow. To make that happen, we all need to do our part to keep the children safe, and ensuring no peanut products enter the classroom is one way you can help.


Are you facing a problem that is being complicated by a health condition or disability? Folks’ advice columnist Erin Ollila wants to help. Email askada@pillpack.com and tell us your problem.

Advice

Ask Ada: Should I Protect My Son From His Chronically Ill Best Friend?

This week, Ada helps a mother teach her son about illness in the face of a friend's cancer. Plus: advice on not feeling bad about your fitness lifestyle!

Welcome to Ask Ada, Folks’ bi-weekly advice column for people impacted by health issues or disability. Want Ada to help you with a problem? Email Ada at askada@pillpack.com or tag @folksstories on Twitter with the #askada hashtag.

How Do I Stop Feeling Jealous Of My Friends’ More Active Lifestyles?

Dear Ada,

I have been sadly triggered by feelings of exercise inadequacy. Eighty-year-old friends brag on their expensive far flung daily classes in faraway places.

I don’t drive but I walk with my cane now as far as I can daily. Carcinoid syndrome causes neuropathy and balance problems and all the dancing and yoga poses in the world cannot bring me peace this year.

What does is still doing housework, walking to local thrift stores and perambulating to shop with my husband in all the long corridors of all our local malls. Love the trees and kids with boundless energy. Thanks for letting me share.

Carolyn

Carolyn,

What you’re experiencing is something that people of all ages go through — the comparison trap. The people in your life boast about their experiences, and you hold these stories like a mirror to your own. Know that there’s no one “right” way to move your body, so long as you move it. Their fancy yoga and dancing classes aren’t any better than your walking and light activity.

While you may feel inadequate on occasion, I want to point out how positive your overall attitude is. You know your limitations, and yet you’ve found activities to keep you active without pushing yourself into pain or discomfort. And not only are you getting out there and getting exercise, but you’re noticing and cherishing all the joy around you — all while spending quality time with the people you love the most. This is something to celebrate.

Know that there’s no one “right” way to move your body, so long as you move it. Their fancy yoga and dancing classes aren’t any better than your walking and light activity.

Your friends may have no clue that their stories are making you feel inadequate. The next time you catch yourself in this situation, invite them into your world instead. Start the conversation by saying, “I wish I were able to participate in dance classes like you do, but my Carcinoid syndrome causes neuropathy and balance problems for me. I spend my exercise time walking, and found the perfect thrift shop. Would you like to walk there with me one day for a little retail therapy?” I’ll bet they’ll be honored to receive the invitation.

One more thing. If you’re looking for ways to conquer these brief moments of feeling less-than, consider repeating affirmations to yourself. It doesn’t matter whether you write them yourself or borrow someone else’s words. You can memorize them or keep a few written ones nearby to read in the moments you need a pick me up. Affirm yourself while looking in a mirror for some extra effectiveness.

To get you started, here are a few affirmations from Louise Hay that are quick to repeat and simple to remember.

“My happy thoughts help create my healthy body.”

“I listen with love to my body’s messages.”

“My body appreciates how I take care of it.”

Remind yourself that you are perfect exactly as you are, and you’ll never have to live up to someone else’s experiences again.

Photo by Samantha Hurley from Burst

Should I Protect My Son From Watching His Friend Get Sick?

Dear Ada —

My son is eight, and one of his friends was just diagnosed with leukemia, and will have to start treatment in the New Year. My son doesn’t know this, but my sister (his aunt) died of leukemia when she was around the same age, which was extremely traumatizing to me as a little girl. Because of this, I want to distance my son from his friend, so he doesn’t have to go through the same kind of pain, but my friends say that’s selfish, and my husband thinks it would send the wrong message. What should I do? How do I protect my son from seeing his friend get sick… and possibly die?

From,

Sharon S.

Sharon,

It’s obvious that you’re a great mom who loves her son and wants to protect him from all the hardships of the world. That being said, your husband and friends are right. Sheltering your son from sickness and death isn’t a good idea. At some point in his life, he’s going to experience both with people that he loves, and it’s best for him to learn and prepare now while he has you to lean on.

Allowing your son to stay close to his friend with leukemia is good for many reasons. It teaches your child compassion and gives him the skills to learn how to support others in their times of need. It introduces both illness and death in a manner that you can control — as much as it’s possible to control these kinds of things — based on the amount of access he has to his friend.

Allowing your son to stay close to his friend with leukemia teaches your child compassion and gives him the skills to learn how to support others in their times of need.

It also benefits his friend, who will definitely lose touch with his social circle in a time he needs support the most. While you may be the only parent with a sibling who passed away from the same illness, you aren’t the only parent considering distancing your son from his friend — and that child certainly could use one now.

At eight years old, your son is developmentally able to understand the concept of death, and he’s likely been exposed to it in movies, video games, and television shows, even if he’s been fortunate to avoid it in his circle of family and friends. However, you don’t want his introduction to morbidity to be what pop culture teaches him. You have the opportunity to guide him, especially with your intimate experience of having gone through this and losing your sister at a young age.

While that moment in your life may have been traumatizing, my hope is that you’ll find some healing in being able to talk about it with your son. It will help him understand this experience better and also make him feel like he knows his aunt better.

While your sister’s death may have been traumatizing, my hope is that you’ll find some healing in being able to talk about it with your son.

One more thing to consider is that your son’s friend’s illness will naturally keep the children away from each other. The child will be immunocompromised or may feel too sick from treatment to take any visitors. Encourage your son to write letters to his friend. Send funny cards. Take pictures of all of the child’s favorite places and activities put the picture in a small scrapbook they can page through when they’re feeling homesick in the hospital. Oh, and when the child is feeling pretty good — spoil them by dropping by with his favorite treat.


Are you facing a problem that is being complicated by a health condition or disability? Folks’ advice columnist Erin Ollila wants to help. Email askada@pillpack.com and tell us your problem.

Advice

Ask Ada: How Do I Have The Perfect Chronically Ill Christmas?

This week, Ada gives advice on how to deal with Christmas when you're newly diagnosed, and how to navigate the New Year's fitness resolutions of your friends when you struggle with an eating disorder.

Welcome to Ask Ada, Folks’ bi-weekly advice column for people impacted by health issues or disability. Want Ada to help you with a problem? Email Ada at askada@pillpack.com or tag @folksstories on Twitter with the #askada hashtag.

Advice On Making My First Chronically Ill Christmas Great?

Dear Ada – This year, after months of fatigue, aching joints, and mysterious rashes, I got an early Christmas present: My doctor told me I have lupus. Since then, when I’m not dealing with symptoms, I’ve been super depressed: most days, it’s a win if I can even get out of bed before nightfall. But Christmas is a big deal in my family, and I’m feeling a lot of pressure to get it together for the holidays. What can I do? I’m in constant pain and have zero energy to get out of bed, let alone go out and shop or do traditional Christmas activities like trim the tree or make gingerbread houses–but my family has been great helping me through this year, and I don’t want to let them down. How can I give them a great Christmas when I’m feeling like this?

Thanks, Lupus the Red-Rashed Reindeer

Reindeer, while this certainly isn’t the type of Christmas present you were hoping for, I’m so glad to hear that after months of suffering you were able to get a diagnosis, so you can begin to treat and manage your symptoms.

Know that it’s OK to feel out of the holiday spirit. There’s a lot happening in your life, and unfortunately, there’s no way to turn on a happy switch just because it’s the holidays.

You say your family has been “great” helping you through this year, which tells me they will probably understand what you’re going through. Sit down with your loved ones—or do a video call if they aren’t close—and be honest. Tell them how much you appreciate their support, but that you’re really floundering right now. Let them know you need some time to rest your body and process this recent news. By sharing your needs with your loved ones and taking care of yourself, you’re actually giving them a great gift: The self-care you need to be present with them throughout the year.

The ultimate gift any person in your family can get this holiday is another year of your love. So take care of yourself this Christmas, and don’t do anything you don’t have the strength to do.

But it sounds like you really want to be able to share in the Christmas spirit with your family, even in this difficult time. So consider adapting some holiday activities to match your current abilities. Maybe, instead of trimming the Christmas tree with your family, you’re the official videographer, capturing memories to look back at with fondness for years to come. Or if you have young children at home, have your partner or another family member lead the gingerbread-house making this year. Everyone can compete against each other as you rest, and then you can judge whose house wins (Pro tip: Make a different award for each child, such as “best use of candy” and “best theme.”)

The ultimate gift any person in your family can get this holiday is another year of your love. So take care of yourself this Christmas, and don’t do anything you don’t have the strength to do.

Remember: Your loved ones want nothing more than your health and happiness. Talking with them or inviting them over to your home will maintain that community you’ve felt with your family all year long–through Christmas and into the future.

How Do I Get Through The Holidays With Anorexia?

Dear Ada,

I am currently in recovery from anorexia. In recovery, we’re asked to do things that run counter to societal norms: cut down on exercise, gain weight, enjoy the occasional dessert. The process leaves me steeped in guilt and shame.

A handful of my friends are actively working on their diets and exercise plans, and share all their fitness schedules and results with me on a regular basis. None of them know I am struggling with an eating disorder. I am very happy for them, and at the same time, I find these conversations triggering. I want to support my friends and maintain my privacy without losing my mind. What can I say to help cut back on the body talk?

Love, Ella

Ella — The world seems to have a hyper-obsession with food and fitness, which, as someone with anorexia, you understand all too well. At their best, conversations about food and fitness can drive conversations and build connections between people, but if you’re struggling with body dysphoria, these conversations can have the opposite effect, and trigger unhealthy thoughts and behaviors. And with the New Year just around the corner, weight-loss resolutions are sure to spill across dinner tables and over the group texts you and your friends share.

Which brings us to your current situation. Your friends don’t understand that sharing their weight loss resolutions with you is triggering. How could they? If you’ve been managing your eating disorder privately, your friends won’t know you’re struggling. In their eyes, they probably see a woman who’s inspiring to them: a friend who put forth an effort to lose weight and achieved results. It’s an incorrect assumption, but perhaps a natural one in a culture which glorifies fitness and weight loss: they aren’t seeing your internal struggle with an eating disorder.

None of which is to say you should tell them you struggle with anorexia if you don’t feel comfortable doing so. You have a right to your privacy. So here are some other options.

Say that there are many different healthy body types, and that you’re uncomfortable with the way our society assumes that a woman can not be beautiful or healthy if they aren’t thin.

First, you could try being honest with them about how you feel, without going into detail about your anorexia. Say that there are many different healthy body types, and that you’re uncomfortable with the way our society assumes that a woman can not be beautiful or healthy if they aren’t thin. Say something like: “Let’s make a resolution that we’ll only share positive thoughts about our bodies with each other, okay?” And if that doesn’t work, there’s always the good ol’ standby of aggressively changing the topic.

That all said, ultimately, the only way your friends are really going to understand what you’re going through is if you let them in. You say you’re struggling with guilt and shame in your recovery. It might feel hard to be vulnerable and open up—it requires a leap of faith–but vulnerabilty and honesty is what ultimately separates real friendships from mere acquaintanceship.

This isn’t to say you need to open up to everyone, but consider telling a few of your closest loved ones. Take a look at the people who are triggering you the most right now, and ask yourself if their friendship is worth investing more into. If it is, consider telling them the truth about what you’re going through, so that you both can be better friends to one another? Or are you comfortable where your friendship already is, in which case, maybe you should distance yourself for awhile if they keep on bringing up triggering subjects.

Either way, whether by opening up to your friends or by redirecting the conversation toward more productive, body-positive topics, be proud: you are acting as an agent of change. Not only will these efforts help bolster your own well-being, but you’ll be setting the stage for your friends to think differently about body talk, too. Soon, they may stop conflating weight loss with health, and encouraging those around them to find more interesting challenges than step counts and lost pounds.

Let’s be real: We’re all a little tired of putting our bodies on display as the topic du jour. This might just be the refreshment (and resolution) your friends need as they head into the New Year.


Are you facing a problem that is being complicated by a health condition or disability? Folks’ advice columnist Erin Ollila wants to help. Email askada@pillpack.com and tell us your problem.

Advice Explainers

Ask Ada: ‘When Should I Tell A Date I’m Disabled?’

In our new advice column, Ada explains the best way to reveal an invisible disability when dating, and helps a husband understand his wife's decision to undergo a life-changing surgical procedure.

Welcome to Ask Ada, Folks’ bi-weekly advice column for people impacted by health issues or disability. Want Ada to help you with a problem? Email Ada at askada@pillpack.com or tag @folksstories on Twitter with the #askada hashtag.

How Do I Tell My Date About My Invisible Disability?

“Dear Ada—Reentering the dating world with an invisible disability is difficult. I’ve had mixed results: scaring people off by revealing it too early on or “being manipulative” by not disclosing it for what they perceived as a long time (~2 months, casually seeing each other). Any advice on navigating this situation?” – Sincerely, Brooke

Dating is one decision after another: What should you wear? Where should you go? How long should you wait to follow up for a second date? An invisible disability forces an additional question on you: When should you mention your diagnosis?

I wish I could tell you that there was a formula: for example, if you’re set up with your date through a friend, disclose your disability on the second date, but if you meet online, wait until at least the fifth. But unfortunately, there’s not, just like there’s no clear formula in most dating dilemmas.

I can, however, tell you that you’re wasting your time by keeping the information to yourself. This isn’t to say you should introduce yourself by saying something like: “Hi, I’m Emily and I suffer from Endometriosis!” But bringing up the topic early helps you weed the good dates from the bad ones.

Disclosing your disability shouldn’t feel like a confession. There’s nothing you need to be ashamed of.

I’d recommend disclosing your disability as soon as you’re sure that you’d like to continue getting to know the person you’re out with. You’re not determining if you want to marry them, just whether they’re worth the disclosure.

That answers the ‘when’ but what about the ‘how’? How should you reveal an invisible disability to your date?

Well, the truth is that disability shouldn’t be some shameful secret. It’s a regular part of your life, and that means the best way to disclose it is for it to come up naturally. So if, for example, you have Crohn’s disease, a good time to disclose that would be after you described your food allergies to the server. You could then follow-up by mentioning to your date how much you’ve learned about food since your diagnosis, then let them ask questions, guiding the conversation along when need be.

The bottom line is that disclosing your disability shouldn’t feel like a confession. There’s nothing you need to be ashamed of. Presenting your truth early and earnestly allows your date to process the news with understanding and compassion. If they don’t, then kick ‘em to the curb and try again.

My Wife Wants To Undergo A Double Mastectomy. Help!

Dear Ada—Recently, my wife of three years discovered that she had the BRCAI mutation, which makes it statistically much more likely that she will get breast cancer. Her mother and grandmother died of breast cancer, so my wife wants to get a preventive double mastectomy. But I’m not so sure. I’ve tried to talk to my wife about it, but she’s adamant there’s nothing to talk about: even though she doesn’t have cancer yet, she’s made up her mind, and it doesn’t matter what I say.

Suffice to say, I’m struggling to accept her decision. It’s not that I’ll love her any less without breasts, and obviously, I don’t want to lose her to cancer. I also know that it’s her body, and ultimately, that makes it her decision. But choosing to go through such an extreme surgical procedure without really asking me how I feel about it hurts, and makes me concerned about our future. What other extreme measures might she choose without talking to me first?

What should I do? What is the right way for us to approach this?” – Sincerely, Sam

It seems as if your issue is less about the double mastectomy and more about the fact that your wife made this major decision on her own and isn’t listening to your concerns. It also sounds like you think she came to this conclusion too suddenly.

But I think the truth is that your wife has probably been weighing this decision for years. When your wife’s grandmother and mother died of breast cancer, she probably began researching her options, including mastectomy. When it was confirmed that he was a carrier of the BRCA1 mutation, your wife’s decision became clear. It isn’t that she’s taking this decision lightly, it’s that she’s had a lot more time to come to terms with the emotional and physical transformation that will follow removing her breasts.

This isn’t about your wife’s breasts: it’s about navigating a difficult time together while fully supporting the other person.

Meanwhile, you’re only processing all of this for the first time. You don’t have the intimate knowledge she’s gained about breast cancer over the years, and because of that, you’re having a hard time grasping her train of thought. It’s not that she is trying to shut you out of the decision-making process, it’s that you are both literally at different stages of processing the news, without realizing where the other person is at.

While your wife is ultimately the only person who can make a decision about her own body, you both still need to try to come to a common understanding as to why she’s making this choice. So ask her to educate you, and explain how how she came to her decision. Tell her you love her, and accept her decision, but be honest about feeling left out, and concerned about what a failure to communicate productively about major life-decisions might mean in the future.

And then, once she explains? Respect her decision, and support her however you can. Because like you said, this isn’t about your wife’s breasts: it’s about navigating a difficult time together while fully supporting the other person.


Are you facing a problem that is being complicated by a health condition or disability? Folks’ advice columnist Erin Ollila wants to help. Email askada@pillpack.com and tell us your problem.