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Cancer The Good Fight

The Magic Healing Power Of A Miniature Therapy Horse

Who says Magic isn't real? This special therapy horse has provided comfort to terminally ill children, and the victims of the Sandy Hook and Pulse Nightclub.

The hospital elevator doors open and out walks Magic, an 11-year-old American miniature therapy horse. Worried faces break out in smiles. Loved ones and hospital staff do a double take.

A little girl, about age seven, tells Magic’s handler that her face hurt from smiling so much. She recently underwent a heart transplant and is fighting leukemia. Nearby, a little boy who was losing his sight because of a brain tumor put his face up against Magic’s so he could always remember what she looked like.

Another little boy with a terminal illness laughs so hard when he sees Magic that his mom begins to cry. She told Debbie Garcia-Bengochea, co-founder of Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses and Magic’s handler: “We never had a happy day and now we’ll always have a happy day.”

Debbie Garcia-Bengochea, Magic’s handler and co-founder of Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses, says: “Sometimes you can’t fix things, but you can give someone a happy day.” We spoke with her to learn more.

Debbie Garcia-Begochea, Magic’s handler and co-founder of Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses

When did you start Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses and why?

Twenty years ago; back then, there were therapy dog programs and a few therapy horseback riding programs. I was a school principal with experience working with children with special needs. I saw a need. And there’s something magical about horses. People are used to seeing dogs indoors, but not horses and definitely not miniature horses.

Our horses go through a two-year training program. They’re taught to be in tight spaces like an elevator or a hospital room. They learn how to go up and down stairs. They’re toilet trained. We don’t teach them tricks or ride them. Our horses offer emotional support. They know how to approach people.

And they know how to stay calm. People take out their cameras, flashes go off, and hospital alarms make noise. The training keeps them safe.

Magic knows who to approach and when. She can sense who needs her. She’ll approach, let the person pet her, sometimes, she’ll lay her head on someone’s lap. She’s 26 ½ inches tall and very approachable.

Where does Magic work?

Magic has visited children and families at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the Pulse Nightclub, Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, and other places where trauma was front and center. In addition to the victims, Magic and the other horses in the program have comforted medical professionals, law enforcement, and families.

The medical staff working with the Pulse Nightclub bodies worked so hard and didn’t have a moment’s rest. When they saw Magic with her deep blue eyes, they smiled. Some even laughed. It’s like she gave them permission.

When Magic isn’t on the road, she works at local hospitals, hospices, and assisted living centers. Her schedule, like the other horses in the program, are two days of work and a week of being a horse. Horses are herd animals and need to be around other horses. Our horses get to run and play.

Our home base is Florida and we’ve traveled to about 30 states and have about 20 volunteers.

Magic visiting a young boy at Ronald McDonald House.

Is Gentle Carousel mostly run by volunteers?

Yes. We depend on them. We have a group of women who sew beautiful homemade toy horses, which we leave on hospital beds. We do a reading program where our horses hoof-a-graph books. We dip their hoofs in ink and stamp the books, which we give away when we get to the hospital or trauma center.

How many people have you helped?

Since we started, about 25,000. We also have a team of volunteers and horses in Europe. Many work in hospitals and orphanages.

You have 21 horses in your program. Why does Magic stand out?

All of our horses are special and everyone has their favorite. Magic has this special ability to find the one person in the room who needs her the most. At a camp, she approached and stood by one little boy who didn’t speak much. He just learned his cancer returned.

Some of our horses work well with children and others prefer older adults. Magic works well with everyone.

One elderly woman in an assisted living home didn’t talk to anyone until she saw Magic. She hadn’t left her room in six months. When she heard Magic was coming, she got up early to wait. She held an old black and white photo of her as a child sitting on a pony. When I arrived, Magic approached and this woman who had not spoken to anyone in a long while, told everyone how beautiful Magic was.

I didn’t know she didn’t talk to anyone. The staff told me. They had tears in their eyes. Now she talks to the staff and the other patients.

A little girl named Caroline takes Magic for a walk.

Tell me about American miniatures.

There’s a wide range of looks and sizes; they can be as large as 34 inches at the shoulder. That’s pony size. Our horses are around 26 inches tall. They can weigh 100 pounds or less. Magic’s jet black with ¾ apron (white) face and deep blue eyes. Our other horses come in all white, tan, a mixture of white and black or tan and white, or they can be spotted. They all have their own personalities. And they all get along. Horses need to be around other horses.

You’ve probably heard that horses can sleep standing up. While that’s true to get true REM sleep, they should lie down. They do that when they feel safe, when other horses are around. They’re prey animals and in a herd some animals stand guard.

American miniatures can live well into their 30s and they can work as long as they’re happy and healthy.

How do you travel with the horses?

We have a horse trailer, which is tricky to park when we’re in a busy city. Often we need police assistance to help us with parking. Our goal is to get a custom minivan to transport the horses.

What makes Magic happy?

Magic has a big ego. She loves getting attention from children and adults. And if there’s a challenging situation, Magic is the horse who can be counted on.

Advice Explainers Mental Health

How To Go To Therapy

Think you don't need therapy? Think again: therapy is for everyone. But there's a right way to do it, and a wrong way.

A lot of people think therapy is only for people who have psychological problems.

Let’s put that stigma to rest. Everyone can benefit from therapy. It’s like going to the gym: going to therapy helps you live a happier, healthier, and more productive life, even if it seems like a drag at the start.


“The biggest misconception about therapy is that you need to have a problem or that there is something wrong with you in order for you to go,” explains Justyna Wawrzonek,  a licensed social worker at the West Hartford Holistic Counseling Center in Connecticut. “That is not what therapy is about. Therapy is basically learning to come home to yourself and be as close to yourself as you can be.”

So even if you think you don’t need a therapist, you should consider making an appointment to see one. It’s an investment into your own wellness every bit as important as eating right, exercising, or the myriad other things people do to improve their quality of life.

But how do you start? How do you find a therapist? And how do you make the most of it?

How to Find a Therapist

First things first. Before you begin the search for a therapist, check with your insurance company.  If you choose to work with a therapist in-network, your insurance company may only cover a certain amount of sessions per year. If you select a therapist who is out-of-network, it is essential to understand your deductible as well as what can and cannot be submitted for out-of-network reimbursement.

Your insurance company’s list of eligible therapists can be overwhelming, so review their specialties. As an adult, you can cross off any therapist that specializes in children or adolescents. Depending on your age, you can either seek out or cross off those who serve geriatric patients. If you are confident that you do not suffer from a specific condition—such as an eating disorder, substance abuse, anxiety, or depression—you can eliminate those specialists as well. However, it’s important to recognize that while you think you understand why you are seeking therapy, once in therapy you may discover there is a different reason entirely.

It’s important to recognize that while you think you understand why you are seeking therapy, once in therapy you may discover there is a different reason entirely.

Once you’ve narrowed down your list, ask your primary care provider for recommendations. You can also check with friends and family if you feel comfortable. Next, rule out deterrents such as location, cost, or lack of appointment flexibility. Then set up initial interviews and ask a series of questions about their approach. This will help you determine if the therapist seems genuine and empathic, if they listen well, and if they ask good questions. During this interview, pay attention to how you two interact: some patients, for example, prefer their therapists to be blunt, while others want their therapists to be more affirming.

What to Expect from Therapy

“In an ongoing therapeutic relationship, you will develop a stronger bond with a therapist,” explains Brian Cassmassi, an adult psychiatrist. “You may not become best friends, but there is definitely a friendlier and easy rapport. Plus, it’s a lot easier to talk about what happened with your days and for the therapist to recall things that may have happened in your past that can clarify a current situation.”

As you become more comfortable with your therapist and continue to learn about yourself, you will develop a growing awareness of the patterns in your life, and how these patterns influence the way you feel and behave. This is what therapy is ultimately about: to gain a deeper understanding of the way everything in your life ties it together.

“Therapy should be challenging and hard—that’s when you know that you are growing.”

“You are the expert of your life,” Wawrzonek explains. “You know where you need to go, what you need to do, and what you want out of life. But you may not know exactly how to get there. It’s the therapist’s job to walk along with the client and help them sort through all the different roadblocks. It is not the therapist’s job to take the client’s hand and lead them somewhere. The client is always in the driver’s seat, and the therapist is using their best judgment as to what may be helpful for their client.”

“Therapy should be challenging and hard—that’s when you know that you are growing,” Wawrzonek continues. “But it also has to have a component of feeling safe, nurturing, and supportive. Without it being hard, safe and supportive, there is something that is missing. All of those components are important.”

What Not to Do in Therapy

Believe it or not, self-sabotage can be common in therapy.

Some of these examples of self-sabotage are obvious. It should go without saying that if you are chronically late or miss the majority of your appointments, you aren’t getting the full benefits of therapy.

But keeping secrets and not being totally honest will also sabotage your therapeutic goals. If your therapist isn’t working with the truth, it’s hard for them to understand what is happening in your life. Therapists aren’t there to judge you or your actions, regardless of their personal beliefs, so don’t be afraid to share.

Your therapist can’t change the world, but they can help you to change yourself.

“If there is a topic that is way too sensitive for you to discuss with your therapist at the moment, but you know it’s important, it may be helpful just to say, ‘there was this rape that happened when I was a teenager, but don’t touch that right now,’” Cassmassi recommends. “During a later session, if you say you were uncomfortable with your boss touching you a certain way last night, the therapist may ask if you want to talk about the rape now or if you still want to talk about your boss.”

Playing the blame game is just as bad. Instead of blaming others for a problem, your therapy should focus on the things you can control. Your therapist can’t change the world, but they can help you to change yourself.

Don’t Be Afraid To Switch Therapists

It’s common to develop a strong connection with your therapist over the years.  Because of this, it may be hard to recognize and accept that you are no longer progressing with your therapist. But if therapy has become a weekly obligation and you are no longer growing, then it may be time for a change.

Remember, therapy is for you, and you should always put yourself first in this relationship. When it is time for a switch, don’t worry about how the therapist will handle the news.

“By the time that somebody is a practicing therapist or psychiatrist, they have gone through thousands of hours of supervision and training,” Cassmassi explains. “While you may think you will hurt our feelings if you leave us, that has been hammered out of us from our training. We are usually well-trained to adapt, and you aren’t going to completely break our hearts if you want to switch.”

Remember: Therapy Is For Everyone

When people haven’t gone to therapy before, they tend to believe it’s only something you do when something is “wrong” with you. But there’s nothing wrong at all with wanting to gain a better understanding of your world, and the tools that therapy teaches us to use—like mindfulness, or coping skills–have broad applications in everything from your career to your love life. .

“One of the things I often hear is, ‘why didn’t someone tell me this in elementary school so that I had this defense skill in my repertoire when I became an adult?’” Cassmassi recalls. “When people finally go to therapy as an adult, they feel like they wish they had at least known a simple trick to help them get through their teenage years. Patients also say, ‘I wish I had that under my belt when I was going through all of this. Maybe those skills would have helped me with some of the minor things, and I would have felt slightly less anxious.’”

“The most important relationship in your life is the one you have with yourself.”

And, it provides a safe place for you to learn and grow under the guidance of a professional who has your best interest in mind.

“The most important relationship in your life is the one you have with yourself,” says Wawrzonek. “And when we can nurture and foster and grow and have a healthy relationship with ourselves, that is going to mirror every other relationship that we have in the world: work, family, and friends. The deeper you get to be yourself, be okay with yourself, accept yourself, love yourself, and be your own best friend, that greatly benefits every area of your life.”