Cancer

The Magic Healing Power Of A Miniature Therapy Horse

Who says Magic isn't real? This special therapy horse has provided comfort to terminally ill children, and the victims of the Sandy Hook and Pulse Nightclub.

The hospital elevator doors open and out walks Magic, an 11-year-old American miniature therapy horse. Worried faces break out in smiles. Loved ones and hospital staff do a double take.

A little girl, about age seven, tells Magic’s handler that her face hurt from smiling so much. She recently underwent a heart transplant and is fighting leukemia. Nearby, a little boy who was losing his sight because of a brain tumor put his face up against Magic’s so he could always remember what she looked like.

Another little boy with a terminal illness laughs so hard when he sees Magic that his mom begins to cry. She told Debbie Garcia-Bengochea, co-founder of Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses and Magic’s handler: “We never had a happy day and now we’ll always have a happy day.”

Debbie Garcia-Bengochea, Magic’s handler and co-founder of Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses, says: “Sometimes you can’t fix things, but you can give someone a happy day.” We spoke with her to learn more.

Debbie Garcia-Begochea, Magic’s handler and co-founder of Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses

When did you start Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses and why?

Twenty years ago; back then, there were therapy dog programs and a few therapy horseback riding programs. I was a school principal with experience working with children with special needs. I saw a need. And there’s something magical about horses. People are used to seeing dogs indoors, but not horses and definitely not miniature horses.

Our horses go through a two-year training program. They’re taught to be in tight spaces like an elevator or a hospital room. They learn how to go up and down stairs. They’re toilet trained. We don’t teach them tricks or ride them. Our horses offer emotional support. They know how to approach people.

And they know how to stay calm. People take out their cameras, flashes go off, and hospital alarms make noise. The training keeps them safe.

Magic knows who to approach and when. She can sense who needs her. She’ll approach, let the person pet her, sometimes, she’ll lay her head on someone’s lap. She’s 26 ½ inches tall and very approachable.

Where does Magic work?

Magic has visited children and families at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the Pulse Nightclub, Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, and other places where trauma was front and center. In addition to the victims, Magic and the other horses in the program have comforted medical professionals, law enforcement, and families.

The medical staff working with the Pulse Nightclub bodies worked so hard and didn’t have a moment’s rest. When they saw Magic with her deep blue eyes, they smiled. Some even laughed. It’s like she gave them permission.

When Magic isn’t on the road, she works at local hospitals, hospices, and assisted living centers. Her schedule, like the other horses in the program, are two days of work and a week of being a horse. Horses are herd animals and need to be around other horses. Our horses get to run and play.

Our home base is Florida and we’ve traveled to about 30 states and have about 20 volunteers.

Magic visiting a young boy at Ronald McDonald House.

Is Gentle Carousel mostly run by volunteers?

Yes. We depend on them. We have a group of women who sew beautiful homemade toy horses, which we leave on hospital beds. We do a reading program where our horses hoof-a-graph books. We dip their hoofs in ink and stamp the books, which we give away when we get to the hospital or trauma center.

How many people have you helped?

Since we started, about 25,000. We also have a team of volunteers and horses in Europe. Many work in hospitals and orphanages.

You have 21 horses in your program. Why does Magic stand out?

All of our horses are special and everyone has their favorite. Magic has this special ability to find the one person in the room who needs her the most. At a camp, she approached and stood by one little boy who didn’t speak much. He just learned his cancer returned.

Some of our horses work well with children and others prefer older adults. Magic works well with everyone.

One elderly woman in an assisted living home didn’t talk to anyone until she saw Magic. She hadn’t left her room in six months. When she heard Magic was coming, she got up early to wait. She held an old black and white photo of her as a child sitting on a pony. When I arrived, Magic approached and this woman who had not spoken to anyone in a long while, told everyone how beautiful Magic was.

I didn’t know she didn’t talk to anyone. The staff told me. They had tears in their eyes. Now she talks to the staff and the other patients.

A little girl named Caroline takes Magic for a walk.

Tell me about American miniatures.

There’s a wide range of looks and sizes; they can be as large as 34 inches at the shoulder. That’s pony size. Our horses are around 26 inches tall. They can weigh 100 pounds or less. Magic’s jet black with ¾ apron (white) face and deep blue eyes. Our other horses come in all white, tan, a mixture of white and black or tan and white, or they can be spotted. They all have their own personalities. And they all get along. Horses need to be around other horses.

You’ve probably heard that horses can sleep standing up. While that’s true to get true REM sleep, they should lie down. They do that when they feel safe, when other horses are around. They’re prey animals and in a herd some animals stand guard.

American miniatures can live well into their 30s and they can work as long as they’re happy and healthy.

How do you travel with the horses?

We have a horse trailer, which is tricky to park when we’re in a busy city. Often we need police assistance to help us with parking. Our goal is to get a custom minivan to transport the horses.

What makes Magic happy?

Magic has a big ego. She loves getting attention from children and adults. And if there’s a challenging situation, Magic is the horse who can be counted on.